The fog that never fades – welcoming the EU friend that never came

Posted on 20. March 2017 by Adnan Rahimić

1-adnan-rahimicIt was a sunny and beautiful day in Sarajevo on 2 March 2017.  The city was full of blue and yellow flags, signs of celebration from the day before – Independence Day. Flags were left hanging from buildings a day longer, probably on purpose – to gently sway and greet very important guest our country was about to receive: Federica Mogherini, High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy/Vice-President of the European Commission. Her visit to Sarajevo was part of her Western Balkan's tour of countries that are EU member state candidates/candidates-to-be. The plan was to meet with the members of the government of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), to talk about the country’s current issues and problematic path toward EU candidacy and also, to give a lecture on the same subject to the academic community of the University of Sarajevo.

A gender equal European Commission in the making

Posted on 8. March 2017

by Matilda Flemming

matilda-flemming2As we celebrate International Women’s Day, let’s take a second to reflect on the opportunities for change ahead of us. While the current European Commission will soon celebrate its mid-term, the gossip surrounding the makeup of the next College of Commissioners is already picking up speed.

As the speculations and wheeling and dealing for creating the next Commission continues, here’s a shout-out to the power parties of Europe - and in particular to the ones that talk big about gender equality: make an official commitment that in 2019 at least 50% of the commissioners will be women, and that anything below that number is unacceptable!

What future for Spain’s PSOE?

Posted on 16. December 2016 by Germán Jiménez Montes

german-jimenez-montesThe Greek tragedy of European social democracy turned into a soap opera last October, after the Spanish Socialist Worker’s Party’s (PSOE) leader, Pedro Sánchez, was forced to resign. The offensive was led by former socialist Prime Minister Felipe González, when he declared in Spain’s most popular morning show that he felt fooled by Sánchez. He argued that in the days following Spain’s June election Sánchez had privately assured him that he was going to respect the wishes of many in the PSOE by dropping his objection to allowing Mariano Rajoy, the leader of the conservative Partido Popular (PP), to form a minority government. Despite this promise, Sánchez refused to give in to the pressure, saying he would do nothing to facilitate the formation of a government led by such a corrupt party as the PP.

Climate change: a call for a united Europe to act

Posted on 15. December 2016 by Marta Remacha Recio

marta-remacha-recio-modifiedCoral bleaching; record-breaking temperatures; the Artic melting; the El Niño phenomenon becoming stronger; despite the success of the Paris Agreement one year ago, scientific evidence of the worsening impact of climate change is piling up. 2016 has even left us with a clear-cut evidence of the irreversibility of some damages: Melomys rubicola, a small rodent endemic to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, holds the dubious honour of becoming the first mammal to be wiped out by human-induced climate change. The fight against global warming has entered a critical phase, which needs a united Europe ready to make the difference.

Will Italy’s post-Renzi government be led by a technocrat?

Posted on 8. December 2016 by Christopher Wratil and Giulia Pastorella

christopher-wratilAlready before Matteo Renzi had lost his constitutional referendum, media around the world claimed that a ‘government of technocrats’ was the most likely option to follow Renzi in case of electoral defeat. Drawing on their analysis of all technocratic governments appointed in 30 European democracies after 1977, Christopher Wratil - FutureLab Europe Member - and Giulia Pastorella estimate a rather low probability of 12-18% for the next Italian administration to be led by a technocrat. A technocratic government is therefore definitely possible but not as likely as suggested by the media.