The FutureLab Europe Annual Forum 2018 – a sneak peek to the programme

10. January 2018 FutureLab Europe will officially welcome 18 young and talented Europeans as members of its seventh generation on the occasion of the Annual Forum 2018, a four-days seminar which will be held in Brussels on January 23 -26. The Annual Forum will mark participants’ official entry into the programme as members of the … Continue reading The FutureLab Europe Annual Forum 2018 – a sneak peek to the programme

Meet the new members of the Advisory Group!

17. January 2018 FutureLab Europe is happy to announce the new members of the Advisory Group for the year 2018. Thomas Baumgartner (2011), Guia Bianchi (2016), Darija Maric (2014), Albert Mejer (2016), Georgi Michev (2011), Simona Pronckute (2015), Adnan Rahimic (2011), Louise Roesen Abildgaard (2017), Stine Solvoll Navarsete (2016) and Violetta Tsitsiliani (2017) will assist and … Continue reading Meet the new members of the Advisory Group!

A message from Tania Marocchi – FutureLab Europe’s new Programme Manager

  18. January 2018 It is a great pleasure for me to take over the leadership of FutureLab Europe.  Since it started in 2011, FutureLab Europe has established itself as a unique programme enabling bright young Europeans to debate with top-level policy makers and shape the future of Europe through their civic engagement.   The … Continue reading A message from Tania Marocchi – FutureLab Europe’s new Programme Manager

The state of the public debate: Polarization at play?

Posted on 31. August 2017 by Anna Kristense Naterstad Berg Harpviken

anna-harpvikenA few years ago, a headline reading: Erdoğan calls Merkel’s stance on EU membership ‘Nazism,’ would have made me raise an eyebrow. Today, such headlines seem entirely normal. This makes me wonder about the development of our news, and in particular about the state of the public debate. It seems as if the debates have gotten harsher, the statements bolder and the headlines bigger. At the same time, people appear increasingly convinced that they are right – less interested in dialogue and reflection. As a student of psychology, with a particular interest in interactions between people and society, this development has both fascinated and frightened me over the last couple of years.

We don’t need no education – Bosnia and Herzegovina’s higher education reform

by Hatidza Jahic and Adnan Rahimic

hatidza-jahic 1-adnan-rahimic

The word ‘reform’ is the most commonly used word in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). One way or another the country has been in some kind of reform process for the past 22 years. Reform became like a family member: we live with reform every day; we eat fruits and vegetables that are produced according to ‘reform’ instructions. The constant use of this word by politicians, teachers, family members and media create the sense that if you want to succeed in life, you have to reform.