The state of the public debate: Polarization at play?

Posted on 31. August 2017 by Anna Kristense Naterstad Berg Harpviken

anna-harpvikenA few years ago, a headline reading: Erdoğan calls Merkel’s stance on EU membership ‘Nazism,’ would have made me raise an eyebrow. Today, such headlines seem entirely normal. This makes me wonder about the development of our news, and in particular about the state of the public debate. It seems as if the debates have gotten harsher, the statements bolder and the headlines bigger. At the same time, people appear increasingly convinced that they are right – less interested in dialogue and reflection. As a student of psychology, with a particular interest in interactions between people and society, this development has both fascinated and frightened me over the last couple of years.

We don’t need no education – Bosnia and Herzegovina’s higher education reform

by Hatidza Jahic and Adnan Rahimic

hatidza-jahic 1-adnan-rahimic

The word ‘reform’ is the most commonly used word in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). One way or another the country has been in some kind of reform process for the past 22 years. Reform became like a family member: we live with reform every day; we eat fruits and vegetables that are produced according to ‘reform’ instructions. The constant use of this word by politicians, teachers, family members and media create the sense that if you want to succeed in life, you have to reform.

The Western Balkans Summit in Trieste – Are the Balkans stuck in the EU’s waiting room post-Brexit?

by Hatidza Jahic and Miruna Troncota

hatidza-jahic miruna-troncota

It’s been almost 15 years since the 2003 Thessaloniki promise of EU membership for the Western Balkans, and the countries in the region are still in the EU’s ‘waiting room’. The European Commission’s ‘White Paper on the Future of Europe’, published on 1 March 2017 does not mention EU enlargement at all. In the context of the 2017 Western Balkans Summit in Trieste, the first one to be organised after the Brexit vote, Miruna Troncotă (Ro) and Hatidza Jahic (BiH) ask: Are the Balkans forever stuck in the EU's waiting room?

Getting civil society organisations and the private sector involved in citizenship education

Getting private sector involved in citizenship education - frontpage - web

How can Belgium’s democratic participation be improved? The improvement of democracy in Belgium can come about through reactivating civic engagement, but civic engagement, in turn, depends on adequate levels of education: citizens need to know why it is worth to mobilise and how they can do it.

[Recap] Futures of Europe Workshop in Copenhagen!

What kind of future would you like to live in? On Saturday, 24 June, 2017, from 13:00–17:30, our project Futures of Europe held its second workshop in Copenhagen, Denmark, in the soon-to-be-opened Litteraturhuset ved Vandkunsten. Read the project's individual workshop recap here and stay in touch with the project via Facebook!  FutureLab Europe members Louise Roesen Abildgaard, Simon Höher and Moritz Borchardt invited locals, friends and students to picture … Continue reading [Recap] Futures of Europe Workshop in Copenhagen!