How the migration crisis has challenged the free movement of people in Europe

12. June 2018

by Anna Saraste

At first, I see only barbed wire and then, walking through the front gates, people from all corners of the globe. A dirty, smelling stream of a liquid dimly resembling water runs down the street. Inside the camp, people huddle together in make-shift homes. One tent can hold up to ten people, daily food rations can only be obtained after queuing for hours. Up until few weeks ago, over 3,000 people had to share a single shower.

Two schools under one roof –  I want you to fight it!

10. April 2018

by Hatidza Jahic

SchoolAn education system that segregates children based on their ethnicity unfortunately still exists in the 21st century in the heart of Europe. Motivated by the cases of children who decide to fight and the children segregation in buses, which took place at the beginning of this school year (2017/2018), I feel responsible to discuss this issue. I want you to be aware of this problem and fight it!

The impact of the #MeToo campaign on the Russian society: is something about to change?

08. March 2018

by Yulia Gershinkova

The #MeToo campaign has become one of the most influential movements against sexual abuse, leading to the biggest scandal in Hollywood in recent history. It brought stories of harassment and sexual assault to the foreground and united millions of women across the globe against all forms of abuse. It was not so in Russia, where the campaign generated different reactions from Russian state media, the film industry and the general public.

#MeToo’s echo in Germany: has German society finally overcome the power of silence?

08. March 2018

by Miriam Mona Muller

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In the international press, Germany is often portrayed as one of the champions of human rights. However, the #MeToo movement has shown that neither politicians nor German society at large has a common understanding of women’s rights. The country struggles to talk about patriarchy, gender-based power relations and sexual abuse, the majority of German people prefer to remain silent. But that situation is about to change; Germany now has its own Weinstein: Dieter Wedel.